zzbear

Roof wood replacement

13 posts in this topic

Hey y'all. Haven't used the POPUP in a few years and unfortunately found that there was wood rot on the sides of the roof, where the support rods attach. It appears that the only way to repair it is to replace or somehow reinforce the wood. Has anyone tackled this job, and there are any tricks I should know about before I begin? I'm pretty good with tools and working with wood, but this one scares me a bit. I can't quite imagine how to support the roof while I replace the wood - the only thing I can think of is something I use for hanging drywall on the ceiling - a homemade t-brace made out of 2x4's with the top support covered in carpet. Any ideas or suggestions would be sooooo appreciated!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Supporting the roof is the easy part. The roof is not that heavy. A 2x4 on the corners should be plenty. You only need to lift it far enough to get at the inside and outside easily.

 

As for the repair... If the rot is where the roof support bracket is anchored to the side panel. You will need to see how far the rot goes. If it is localized to the mounting area, my suggestion would be to make a sandwich.

 

With the roof supported remove the bracket. Fabricate 2 sheets of metal about 1/8" thick, bolt the metal in a sandwich with the roof panel in between. Then mount the bracket to the metal. Use a lot of sealer between the metal and the roof panel and around the edges. Seal the rest of the roof. And Check the other mounting areas for damage as this may be a trend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the construction of the roof? I just replaced the wood at the end of my roof a couple of weeks ago. My roof is sheet metal over a plywood shell. I didn't have to replace the pieces on the sides, where the lift arms are attached, but I was able to seal those off from the new plywood. If the work is going to be extensive, I would recommend unbolting everything and removing the entire roof and rebuilding it upside-down.

 

My PUP is old school with external manual lift arms, so the entire roof is held up with 4 T-nuts and the bolts through the arms. Depending on your roof construction will dictate what you need to do to replace or re-inforce the connections. If you can provide some more detail, I might be able to come up with some more suggestions.

 

Best of luck, I know that mine was quite a challenge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The roof is "old school" like yours. That was my concern with supporting the roof and why I'm contemplating doing it from the inside. I was thinking if I do one end at a time and support the end I'm fixing with my "drywall support" thing, I'd be able to unbolt the supports and replace the wood. I like the idea of using metal for added support also. That's what scares me now - It appears that the only thing that is holding the roof up is rotten wood and whatever the outer material of the camper is. The camper sat for 2 years and I just got it back, so I don't know when the damage occurred. It appears water entered through the roof seam, and once it started to expand, it opened up the gap in multiple places and the rot is nearly from end to end. Only the middle seems to have been spared.

 

Thanks for the suggestions so far - it's giving me some concrete ideas...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have already seen enough expansion in the wood to open up seams, then I would almost put money down that the wood needs to be replaced. The issue with putting in metal plates, is #1 how do you attach lift arms, without interference on the inside of the roof/potential damage to the canvas, and #2 how do you insure secure attachment to wood that may have started to delaminate. I don't think you want a bunch of bolts running through the side of your roof. I will try to post some photos of what I did on my repair, I don't have a lot of detail visible, and I only had to repair the rear panel of the roof that did not have any lift supports attached, but it might give you some ideas. If you have to replace the wood, I used marine plywood, so I don't have to worry about water on that section again. I also used silicon between the new panel and the existing to stop the travel of moisture from one panel to the next.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I figured out what I need to do - now I just need a couple of days off in a row without rain so that I can do it! Thanks for all of the ideas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think I figured out what I need to do - now I just need a couple of days off in a row without rain so that I can do it! Thanks for all of the ideas.

Its a fun job I just did the roadside on my 16ft Viking. I popped the roof up about 2 ft and put 2x4s at the end boards and let the roof down on them. Then removed the corner pieces and bottom trim then peeled the metal up and unbolted the lift arms and removed the rotton wood and scraped the rotton wood from the metal. I took the measurements from the endboards and spliced osb together with glue and screws. Then pullrd the metal down and installed the bottom trim .drilled and bolted up the lifts and put the corners back on. took about 4 hours to get it done. Gonna do a complete rebuild of the roof this winter. Best advice is take your time and think out you moves. Good Luck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I finally got around to it - it was more work than I had time for, so I did a temporary fix until I have a full day off to do it right. Scraped out the rotten wood where the brackets are and replaced about a 1 foot section, then drilled and remounted the brackets. Did a hack job on it, but at least I know the roof isn't going to drop when I jack it up. It was close to doing just that. The only thing holding up the roof was the inside and outside sheeting. Over winter, I'm going to garage it and do it right - replace all of the wood and seal it thoroughly.

 

Thanks for all the help!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No rocket science in a Pop-up roof, but always good to get input from the experience here on the board before you start. It also helps others out. For the rest of us, this post is a good reminder to replace the caulk on our roofs each time it shows any sign of age.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just did mine, replaced one side board at a time so the other three pretty much supported the roof while I had one off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Using a 2x4 t-brace is good enough for the roof. It can surely support the load of the roof but if the rot is big you should do other precautionary method. If you are afraid it might fall on you, I suggest you ask help from someone who can help you support the roof. Roofing Companies

Edited by ricaroofers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now